Oddly Head - The End

     Oddly Head - The End

Oddly Head 

Oddly Head 

Oddly Head

 

Making art as Oddly Head is first and foremost an act of personal catharsis.I feel at my most positive when creating a new piece of work. 

Living in an era when the concept of recycling is key to anything approaching a sustainable future for our species, it feels apposite to re-use and repurpose existing imagery. I’ve listened to hip-hop most of my life and so that idea of making something fresh out of something old really chimes with me. Also, I love the two disciplines involved in collage – the research and the arrangement. It’s all hugely time-consuming and thus hugely absorbing.

Much of my work is a reaction to but also facilitated by the overwhelming proliferation of images the internet continuously coughs up. The internet ushered in an age of instant gratification and unfettered choice. Oddly Head is my coming to terms with this new way of being. I’m as addicted as anyone and have become a rolling news obsessive.

Oddly Head is the alter ego of Tim Fishlock. Tim’s creative output for the past twenty years has been incredibly varied. After graduating from Goldsmiths’ College he began his career by making large-scale artworks for Thomas Heatherwick Studio. By the late nineties he was getting commissions to design and fabricate art installations himself for PR companies and luxury retailers. A restless soul, Tim changed tack and went to work for The Partners. Here he worked on a number of award winning graphic design and branding projects. Since going solo in 2008 Tim began work on Oddly Head at the beginning of 2014. Laid low by life and hooked up to an IV drip of Pop Art, Adam Curtis documentaries and books by John Gray, all the while soundtracked by John Cooper Clarke’s Chicken Town, he coughed up a body of work that is both alarming and hilarious. It’s also rather beautiful.

Tim Fishlock aka Oddly Head states, "We’re living in an epoch of demagoguery and debacle. As a result, there is a process of inner migration, an opting out of reality. As a species, we’re running 21st-century software on hardware that hasn’t been updated for 50,000 years and we’re not coping at all well. Have we ever been so vulnerable and so self-absorbed? Against this backdrop, my work is an investigation but also an admission of my own fallibility”